Category: BLOG

AUTUMN STYLE EDIT

Autumn Style

Autumn is my absolute favourite season. On a cold and rainy Sunday, I love to stay at home listening to Radio 6 Music while I sip red wine and potter about. Crisp Saturday mornings are often spent on walks with my children amongst the trees, with the buzz of the London skyline on the periphery. Indeed there is a chill in the air, but the sun is high in the sky and wonderfully warming on my face. Later, the evenings are spent cosied up in blankets watching movies; in fact do I ever want to go out these days? Actually no, I just want to sit at home in tights and big jumpers looking at pictures of Jane and Serge because this season, I am in love with the style of the 1970s.

Editor's Picks: Best Vegan Boots for Fall | Jane birkin, Jane birkin style, Serge gainsbourg Image via Style.com

 

Inspiration

Autumnal golds, reds, browns and purples, jewelled hues and The 1970s. George Harrison’s beautifully decorative clothing, alongside Keith Richard’s iconic look of layered up scarves. Furthermore, the high waisted trousers, long boots, big hair and heavily lined eyes on Patti Boyd, Anita Pallenberg and Jane Birkin.

Keith Richards

 

 

Embed from Getty Images

 

Anita and Mick

 

The Jennr Autumn Style Edit

A sort of Patti Boyd and Keith Richards mash up of clashing prints and textures. A silk scarf and vintage wool hat accessorise this wearable curation and a glittery purple eyeshadow finishes the look. This is Autumn style inspired by the 1970s!

The brands featured in this edit are doing their bit to be more ethical and sustainable. In addition, are vintage finds and high quality staples designed to belong in a wardrobe forever, not thrown away after only a couple of wears.

The Beautifully embellished jacket is by Maudde and the Patti Boyd style floppy hat is by M&S. Both are vintage finds.

The Faux leather trousers are by Stella McCartney via online shopping portal, MyTheresa. They sit high on the waist for 70s style with an edge.

The embroidered blouse is by SEA, a brand with a gorgeous aesthetic. They make unique and wearable pieces that will become wardrobe staples.

Sparkly purple eyeshadow by my favourite cruelty-free make up brand, Ilamasqua punctuates this look.

A Keith Richards inspired ensemble needs a skinny scarf or two. Layer them up and add jewellery. This 100% organic peace silk scarf is by Jennr.

A 1970s inspired outfit wouldn’t be complete without a brilliant pair of boots. Shown here are vegan boots by Beyond Skin ‘A ladies designer footwear label with a sustainable DNA’

Shop the look

Black Faux Leather Trousers by Stella McCartney Stella McCartney Faux Leather trousers

Embellished Jacket by Maude Preloved Luxury https://www.maudde.com/products/vintage-embellished-silk-fitted-jacket-fits-s 

Victoria Embroidered Blouse  Sea Blouse

Eyeshadow, Ilamasqua https://www.illamasqua.com/illamasqua-iconic-chromes-various-shades/11911666.html

Leopard Skinny Scarf  https://lovejennr.com/shop/luxury-silk-scarves-ethically-made-from-non-violent-silk/jaguar-twilly/

Vegan Tan Boots https://beyond-skin.com/vegan-shoes/roxie-b-camel-faux-leather-knee-high-vegan-boots/

Vintage Wool Floppy Hat, M&S  Ebay M&S Floppy Hat

 

My Autumn Play list:


UNIQUE AND ETHICALLY MADE SILK SCARVES

Introducing uniquely designed and ethically made silk scarves by Jennr.

Jennr scarves are made ethically from 100% Organic Peace Silk, manufactured in India. Peace silk is a type of silk produced from silk threads that have been extracted only once the silk worm has emerged from its cocoon as a fully formed moth. This is a much kinder method of silk production, because it allows the silk worm to complete its full life cycle. After the moth emerges from the cocoon, the silk threads are then collected by hand and woven into silk threads. This method of harvesting the silk is much more time consuming. However the silks produced are just as beautiful, if not more so, because they have been produced without causing harm to the silk worm. You can read more about how Peace Silk is manufactured here: https://lovejennr.com/peace-silk/

Transparency

Jennr supports the view that greater transparency is needed in the fashion industry. Customers should know where their product comes from and how it has been produced, for instance. Not only does our silk manufacturer produce non-violent silk, they also provide ethical working conditions and support four NGO’s working for wild life conservation, disabled care and girl child education. You can read more about the company that provided the silk for our current collection here: https://www.aaeco.net/aboutus.htm

Design Inspiration

Our current collection is inspired by Ancient Japanese Prints and features original illustrations in gloriously pretty hues. To compliment our unique designs we selected a light-weight, satiny silk that is wonderfully soft, with a fantastic drape.

Presentation and Packaging

Each scarf is beautifully finished with machine rolled hems and hand sewn corners. Your scarf will be neatly presented in a box made from recycled card, the lid of the box is embossed with the Jennr logo.

View the collection of Ethically made Silk Scarves here: https://lovejennr.com/product-category/luxury-silk-scarves-ethically-made-from-non-violent-silk/

 

 


SUSTAINABLE VEGAN SILK

Here at Jennr HQ (basically my laptop and an extremely overloaded desk) I am tirelessly searching for the next buzz in sustainable and eco friendly fabrics. Recently I have been exploring vegan fabrics, as I endeavour to create a range of silky scarves made from, guess what, NO SILK!

While I am a huge fan of Peace Silk and the ethical and sustainable methods used by the manufacturers we have carefully chosen to supply our silk, I envisage printing our designs on a completely non-animal derived fabric. One with the same luxurious qualities as silk of course!

Unfortunately many vegan fabrics, have a hugely damaging impact on the environment (not to mention the unethical working practises that come with the mass production of these fabrics.) However, new technologies in textile manufacturing have allowed for some exciting developments.

One remarkable achievement is that of a fabric produced entirely from  orange peel Yes really! But until fabrics like this are more readily available, I have come up with a list of some vegan and earth friendly alternatives to silk.

Modal and Lyocell 

For me these are the big hitters due to how closely the fibres imitate the soft, drapey feel of silk.

Lyocell is the second generation of Modal a fabric produced from wood pulp. Lyocell is sustainable because it is produced from renewable trees. Moreover, it uses far less water than cotton, in its production.

Tencel is a brand of Lyocell that is committed to environmentally sound production.

Linen

It has long been a more eco friendly alternative to cotton and very lightweight mixes offer a soft breathable fabric, a good alternative to lightweight silks!

Linen only requires rain water to grow unlike cotton. It is soft, breathable and can be mixed with other fabrics. It requires fewer harmful chemicals in its production and is completely biodegradable. HURRAH!

https://goodonyou.eco/how-sustainable-is-linen/

Recycled polyester/rPET

Recycled polyester is made from the same material used to make plastic drinking bottles. The material in its raw form is called PET and turning PET into garments we can wear over and over again, prevents it ending up as landfill. Wonderfully satiny textures can be created from rPET and therefore it makes a great alternative to silk.

Recycled polyester also takes much less energy to produce than normal polyester. Moreover, when you are finished with your garment, if it isn’t passed on for someone else to use, it can be recycled again!

https://textilsantanderina.com/recycled-polyester/

Organic cotton

There has been a recent storm in the media about how the manufacturing of cotton is simply not sustainable. In fact, 20000 litres of water are needed to produce just 1 kg of cotton, that is the equivalent to one top and pair of trousers!

No harmful chemicals are used to grow organic cotton, making it a better friend to the planet. It is, by no means the most eco friendly material out there, but it is a good alternative to non organic cotton.

https://theswatchbook.offsetwarehouse.com/2014/12/10/eco-fashion-design-why-use-organic-fabric/

Hemp

Hemp is a champion of eco friendly, natural and sustainable fabrics. It doesn’t require pesticides and retains water well due to its root structure, so it can be grown organically with ease. It is breathable, bacteria inhibiting and completely biodegradable. What’s not to like!

Technological advancements in fabric production allow for softer fibres and shearer densities to be rendered from hemp. Thus enabling Hemp to shake off its heavy, rough reputation of the past.

https://fashionunited.uk/news/business/sustainable-textile-innovations-hemp-fibres/2017071025112

Personally I am very excited to explore how our prints turn out on lyocell and lyocell mixes this year and have also just ordered some swatches of recycled polyester to trial!